Fingerprint Clocking In Machines Underground

Fingerprint Clocking In Machines Go Down The Tube.

Fingerprint clocking in machines have been  introduced onto the London Underground, in an attempt to stop the cleaners cleaning up on pay day. Their employers seem to be suspicious that the  hours claimed may not be 100% legitimate.

By Jasper Hamill, 16th September 2013

london-underground-logoCleaners working on the London Underground will resort to industrial action this week in protest against the introduction of a controversial biometric clocking system.

Starting at just after midnight on Thursday morning, “up to 300 cleaners” will join in the action by refusing to scan their fingerprints every time they clock on for work, said the union. Their decision will set the workers on a collision course with ISS, the Danish firm which employs them.

 According to the RMT union, 98 per cent of the 103 staffers who responded to the ballot voted in favour of the plans, which stopped short of calling for a full-on strike.

Bob Crow, RMT general secretary, said: “Our tube cleaning members have been urged to stand firm and follow the call by the union to take industrial action short of a strike by refusing to use any biometric/fingerprint technology to book on for duty. We believe this technology infringes on staff civil liberties and the overwhelming vote in favour of action shows our members’ strength of feeling on this issue.

“Strong union organisation in the workplace is the key to preventing this unacceptable method of booking on and RMT will continue to build our ‘Thumbs Down to Fingerprinting’ campaign.”

The union is vague on exactly why biometric fingerprinting is a bad idea. When The Register contacted the RMT, a spokesperson told us staff felt “brutalised” by the system, which made them feel like “slabs of meat”.

The union said it represented between 200 and 300 cleaners, and said that ISS had “bulldozed” the biometric system into use, against the wishes of its staff.

RMT also suggested the fingerprint-based sign-in system infringed the cleaners’ “dignity”. The previous clocking-on method involved an automated phone line and a sheet of paper.

Originally from : http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/09/16/tube_workers_to_launch_protest

By the BBC 17th September 2013 – On Thursday, hundreds of workers plan to refuse to cooperate with the clocking-in system after 98% of those who voted in a ballot opted for the action, said the RMT union.

The technology infringed their rights, the union added. The cleaners – who are employed by Danish firm ISS UK – will continue to sign in manually and by phone. “We believe this technology infringes on staff civil liberties and the overwhelming vote in favour of action shows our members’ strength of feeling on this issue,” said Bob Crow, RMT’s general secretary. But Adam Wurf, communications director for ISS UK told the BBC: “With this technology we will be able to guarantee that the member of staff is who they say they are.

“We don’t think this is draconian or an infringement of civil liberties; it’s about making sure we have the right people – verified and trained – in the right place at the right time.”

Originally from : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-24117006

timegenius ltdSummary:  Journalist Stephen Chittenden from BBC Radio Five Live called us and asked for our comment on the refusal by London Underground cleaning staff to use the biometric fingerprint clocking in system which was introduced by their Danish employer, who simply wanted to ensure they were not overpaying people for the hours claimed each payday.

We explained to Stephen that it was just another example of Unionised interference and over reaction to a harmless use of biometric technology to ensure “fair play” to both sides, the employee and the employer.

The Union is justifying its own existence by stirring up trouble on a topic that is almost guaranteed to get a an overexcited overreaction when presented as an infringement of your human rights.  The Union knows the introduction of a fingerprint clocking on system makes sense, they just want to feel needed by their members and are blatantly playing the “your rights are being infringed card, were here to protect you against this sort of thing”.  The Union should be ashamed of themselves.

fingerprint clocking in systems

 

 

Fingerprint time clock systems down under

Fingerprint Time Clock Systems Are On The Up Down Under.

Our Aussie cousins have found that payroll preparation is time consuming and errors cause unhappy employees, or costly loss for the employer. Fingerprint time clock systems will ensure accuracy and speed on payroll day.

Brisbane, QLD, Australia (PRWEB) July 08, 2013

shutterstock_22536877Aussie Time Clocks, the leading provider of Fingertec time management software in the Australia, has released the enhanced version of Fingertec’s time clock systems to provide support and integration capabilities with leading payroll processing systems such as MYOB®, MYOB EXO®, Unipay®, Attache® and ePayroll® along with other prominent payroll processing service providers.

It can be a daunting task for small and medium sized businesses to process their payroll manually. Dealing with large amounts of employee time and attendance data and compiling it into a format that can be used later for processing payroll is no easy task if done manually. Even after the employee hours data has been compiled, the payroll personnel has to manually calculate employee wages with each employee having a different pay scale making the whole process highly time consuming.

Dealing with payroll is a recurring requirement as the task has to be repeated at each pay-cycle. Businesses employing more than 10 employees can have rather tough time preparing an accurate and timely payroll as hourly employees can have varying degrees of pay-grad and overtime structure.

In addition to being a tedious and labour-intensive task, the whole process is fraught with human error resulting in overpayment or employee complaining about being shortchanged. Australian businesses now have the ability to do away with manual processing of employee payroll thanks to the export and integration capabilities offered by Fingertec timesheet software.

The newly introduced integration capabilities can help Australian small and medium sized businesses save valuable time and resources that were otherwise required for processing their payroll manually. The automation and the resultant elimination of human error can help reduce dependence on human capital, streamline the whole payroll management process, and save loads of revenues for local businesses.

MYOB®, along with Unipay®, Attache® and ePayroll®, are some of the most commonly used payroll processing systems in Australian workplaces. MYOB® provides a timesheet feature in its payroll system where the users can import timesheets in a number of formats. The tedious job of payroll now becomes a walk in the park by exporting pre-calculated timesheets from Fingertec time attendance clock system into the MYOB® Timesheet Export File doing away with all the manual data entry. Originally from : http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10892995.htm.

Summary: Manual calculation of employee time and attendance hours can be improved, and the introduction of fingerprint time clock systems has proven through use over time, to provide results beyond most peoples expectations.

fingerprint clocking in systems

Clocking Systems and Biometrics

Clocking Systems And Biometrics Are Made For Each Other – This Technology Is Tailor Made For The Monitoring Of Employee Attendance At Work

timegenius ltdEmployee time theft is a problem that can go unseen. Everyone knows it goes on, but how to stop it. Well one Company is aiming to bring a solution to the table. One that will benefit the employee as well as the employer, clocking systems may never be the same.

Amherst, New York (PRWEB) May 07, 2013

ENTERTECH SYSTEMS (http://www.entertechsystems.com ) is exhibiting the next generation of time and attendance biometric clocking systems and modules with Suprema (http://www.supremainc.com) at the 31st Annual APA Congress today, from May 7 to 11 at the Gaylord Texan Hotel and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas in booth #516. The company will be showcasing “one touch” time and attendance systems that stop buddy punching and employee time theft – demonstrating to businesses at the show how they can protect their bottom line throughout their organization and across their multiple locations.

clocking systemsCommon ways that employee time theft is committed occurs through buddy punching – the practice of employees entering or stamping time cards, punch cards or passwords on behalf of another employee.

Time theft could also be committed, intentionally or unintentionally, through employee late arrivals or through lax tracking of sick and vacation days.

Traditional punch card clocking systems and even attendance sheets rely on the honor system of each and every employee adhering to the rules set out by management. With a biometric clocking system, only verified time that is tied to the true identity of the employee is recorded for administration and integrated for payroll processing.

“Biometric fingerprint and face recognition are at the cutting edge of the most accurate ways to collect employee time and attendance information as they are uniquely linked to each employee and cannot be shared, lost or stolen,” said Rob Douglas, CEO of ENTERTECH SYSTEMS. “With ENTERTECH SYSTEMS, businesses can now easily track employees’ time and attendance with just the touch of a finger through the number one algorithm in the market.”

Watch the following video to learn more about how businesses can benefit from biometric based time and attendance.

http://www.entertechsystems.com/identity-management-solutions/time-and-attendance.aspx.

Originally from:  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/5/prweb10706912.htm

 

Summary…

I’m really excited about this new offering from Entertech Systems, the rate at which clocking systems and biometrics have merged and complimented each other in the past few years has recharged the time and attendance systems industry, and put it back on the menu as a reliable option to ensure employees are paid fairly for their time.

 

clocking in systems

 

fingerprint clocking in systems

Fingerprint Clocking In Systems and The General Use Of Biometrics To Monitor Employees, Is Still Causing Controversy In The City

Employee Monitoring: McCague Borlack, Toronto Law Firm, Aims To Fingerprint Non-Lawyer Staff

fingerprint clocking in systemA group of legal secretaries at a Toronto corporate law firm is rebelling online against a plan that would see them fingerprinted when they come and go at work.

McCague Borlack LLP, a law firm that specializes in banking and insurance litigation, is planning to implement fingerprint reading technology at its offices this month, to address complaints about employees who were taking excessively long lunch breaks or cutting out early from work. The new system will not apply to the company’s lawyers, only its administrative staff.

Some people were abusing the system,” founding partner Howard Borlack told theToronto Star. “We had people taking two to three hours for lunch and we had no way of knowing. . . . Some people were complaining.”

He said the primary purpose of the new system was to improve building security, but being able to track workers is “a huge bonus.”

Employees of the firm have evidently launched a website, called Which Finger to Give to Bay Street, to protest the move.

“Life is good for the lawyers at the firm; their money keeps rolling in at $400/hr. Often at a higher rate! Their secretaries are not so lucky. Secretaries at this firm earn 20 times less than these fancy Bay Street Lawyers. And secretaries are treated with the following degrading contempt: a finger printing program!” the website states.

I suspect that the vast majority of workers will find forced fingerprinting by their employer to be offensive. Certainly, [I] suspect highly qualified legal secretaries won’t be rushing to come work at this firm now,” York University labour professor David Doorey wrote on his blog.

Doorey notes that fingerprinting workers could violate work contracts if those work contracts stipulate some measure of privacy. But he suggested legal recourse could be sparse for the employees.

Originally from : http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/11/01/mccague-borlack-fingerprint-employees_n_2058258.html

Summary
As long as a small section of the workforce is prepared to take advantage and lengthen their lunch breaks at the expense of other more conscientious employees, there will be the need to monitor everyone, to ensure people are not abusing the system. It improves moral of the people who do come in on time and don’t leave early, to see such a technology like fingerprint clocking in systems, introduced into the workplace. Only the cheaters have anything to fear.

fingerprint clocking in systems