Clocking in clocks never lie

Clocking In Clocks Never Lie And Are Above  Suspicion And The long Arm Of The Law

Police officers’ clocking in clock cards show they worked at multiple places at once!


July 22, 2013|By Matthew Walberg and Joe Mahr, Chicago Tribune reporters

shutterstock_31839181Andre Sneed, a former Harvey police officer, believes he was fired from the department after he raised concerns about payroll issues.

Authorities say two high-ranking Harvey police officers have been reassigned amid a Tribune investigation that found records showing them working for two communities during the same hours and getting paid by both.

The veteran officers each held full-time positions with the south suburban department while working security details that paid $19 to $25 an hour for two school districts, according to public records obtained by the newspaper.

The Tribune review found scores of unexplained inconsistencies in which the officers were reported on duty in Harvey during the same hours they were also getting paid to watch over school halls and sporting events miles away.

The records raise questions about why their bosses took so long to investigate. Harvey officials were tipped off to possible payroll discrepancies in 2011, yet they waited to take key steps to investigate the allegations until after the Tribune requested copies of time cards this summer.

The time cards for one of the officers, Cmdr. Roy Wells, 52, suggest he may have overlapped at least 200 hours since 2008, the equivalent of five full-time weeks of work. For example, on one day, he was paid for working 22 hours for the three agencies during one 24-hour period, the time cards show.

The other officer — Steven Porter, 52 — was Harvey’s senior police investigator in internal affairs, a role that made him one of the agency’s top ethics watchdogs. His time cards showed overlap of at least 120 hours since 2008, the equivalent of three full-time weeks.

Wells and Porter told the Tribune they were honest about their hours and suspect some of their time cards have mistaken entries.

Wells was paid $75,000 a year by Harvey and collected as much as $28,000 a year from the districts. He said there was “a very good explanation” for the discrepancies and that he expects to be vindicated.

Porter was paid $67,000 a year by Harvey and collected as much as $12,000 a year from the districts. Porter said he “acted appropriately” at all times.

“Look, I don’t cheat on my job,” Porter said. “I’m 28 years on the job. No way I’m going to throw away my career.”

Harvey police said they’ve contacted the Cook County State’s Attorney’s office about the suspected payroll irregularities. Prosecutors declined to comment.

Three places at once?

The Tribune obtained pay and timekeeping records for Wells and Porter from Harvey police, Rich Township High School District 227 and Homewood-Flossmoor High School District 233 through the open records act.

To allow for the possibility of small differences between the various employers’ time clocks, the newspaper’s review focused on dates in which someone clocked into a second job at least a half-hour before he clocked out of the first.

The analysis of the time cards from 2008 through May found that:

For Wells, there were at least 92 days when he was listed as working in two places at once. The average overlap was more than two hours each day. And there was an overlap in nearly one-third of all days he worked at a school.

On one day in early 2009, Wells’ time cards suggest he was in three places at one time.Records show he worked from 8:25 a.m. to 6:39 p.m. in Harvey, but started shifts at both high schools at 4:30 p.m.

The time cards said he worked until 6:30 p.m. at Rich Township, and until 10 p.m. at Homewood-Flossmoor.

For Porter, there were at least 101 days when time cards indicated he was in two places at once, with an average overlap of more than an hour. And there was an overlap in more than one-third of all days he worked at a school.

On a Tuesday in March 2010, time cards indicated he worked a full day at Harvey, clocking out at 5 p.m., but not before he started a 4 p.m. shift at Homewood-Flossmoor. That shift is shown lasting until 10 p.m., but he also started another shift at Rich Township at 6 p.m., which also lasted until 10 p.m., according to records.

Wells was asked about some discrepancies last year as part of a civil case. He said he sometimes worked in a Rich Township school for a few hours in the morning and then for a few hours later that same day.

Wells said Rich Township’s computer system required that he submit his hours as if he worked them all in a row. That could explain, he said, why his time cards would suggest a discrepancy when there wasn’t one.

Originally from : http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-07-22/news/ct-met-harvey-police-payroll-20130722_1_harvey-police-officers-time-cards-districts

 

timegenius ltdSummary: It seems these police officers are calling the clocking in clock a liar after all.  In fact its the best witness you can have, indisbutable evidence at your fingertips.  Its a sure way of introducing justice into the workplace, to avoid the age old time theft problem, as we have seen alleged in this news item.

clocking in systems

Clocking Systems and Biometrics

Clocking Systems And Biometrics Are Made For Each Other – This Technology Is Tailor Made For The Monitoring Of Employee Attendance At Work

timegenius ltdEmployee time theft is a problem that can go unseen. Everyone knows it goes on, but how to stop it. Well one Company is aiming to bring a solution to the table. One that will benefit the employee as well as the employer, clocking systems may never be the same.

Amherst, New York (PRWEB) May 07, 2013

ENTERTECH SYSTEMS (http://www.entertechsystems.com ) is exhibiting the next generation of time and attendance biometric clocking systems and modules with Suprema (http://www.supremainc.com) at the 31st Annual APA Congress today, from May 7 to 11 at the Gaylord Texan Hotel and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas in booth #516. The company will be showcasing “one touch” time and attendance systems that stop buddy punching and employee time theft – demonstrating to businesses at the show how they can protect their bottom line throughout their organization and across their multiple locations.

clocking systemsCommon ways that employee time theft is committed occurs through buddy punching – the practice of employees entering or stamping time cards, punch cards or passwords on behalf of another employee.

Time theft could also be committed, intentionally or unintentionally, through employee late arrivals or through lax tracking of sick and vacation days.

Traditional punch card clocking systems and even attendance sheets rely on the honor system of each and every employee adhering to the rules set out by management. With a biometric clocking system, only verified time that is tied to the true identity of the employee is recorded for administration and integrated for payroll processing.

“Biometric fingerprint and face recognition are at the cutting edge of the most accurate ways to collect employee time and attendance information as they are uniquely linked to each employee and cannot be shared, lost or stolen,” said Rob Douglas, CEO of ENTERTECH SYSTEMS. “With ENTERTECH SYSTEMS, businesses can now easily track employees’ time and attendance with just the touch of a finger through the number one algorithm in the market.”

Watch the following video to learn more about how businesses can benefit from biometric based time and attendance.

http://www.entertechsystems.com/identity-management-solutions/time-and-attendance.aspx.

Originally from:  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/5/prweb10706912.htm

 

Summary…

I’m really excited about this new offering from Entertech Systems, the rate at which clocking systems and biometrics have merged and complimented each other in the past few years has recharged the time and attendance systems industry, and put it back on the menu as a reliable option to ensure employees are paid fairly for their time.

 

clocking in systems

 

Clock In Machine Tradeup

A Clock In Machine Will Give You The Confidence That You’re Payroll Run Will Be Fast, Accurate And True.

timegenius ltdDo you get that nagging feeling when running your payroll that there might be errors in your employee’s pay packet, either you may be paying to little or to much. Todays clock in machine does not need regular oiling like the ones back in the day.  Times have changed, and the today’s new solid state software driven clock in machine is fast and accurate, giving you peace of mind that your not being cheated or unknowingly cheating your employee.

clock in machinePress release date: June 11, 2013

To help, the company turned to Lathem’s PayClock Online mobile application that allows workers to clock in and out on smart phones or tablets, with a GPS tracking feature that records exactly where employees are when they clock in and out.

“With PayClock Online’s GPS function, we know exactly when and where our employees are clocking in,” said Heidi Hintz, operations manager at Crime Prevention Agency ATL. “It makes us more available to focus on other areas of the business.”

In addition to eliminating the need to be at every work site checking up on their employees, managers can prepare payroll hours anytime, anywhere. PayClock Online saves time and money, too. “We don’t have to check in on our employees all the time anymore,” Hintz said. “PayClock Online does it for me. And it used to take me days to do payroll; now it takes only an hour.”

Crime Prevention Agency ATL is just one of the thousands of small businesses using Lathem’s PayClock Online mobile application.

“PayClock Online’s mobile application is the next evolution in time management,” said Lance Whipple, Lathem vice president, Sales and Marketing. “The market demands technology that meets the needs of today’s flexible and remote workforce. This solution simplifies time and attendance and saves businesses time and money.”

PayClock Online’s mobile features include:

Payroll processing at the manager’s convenience. With web-enabled devices, such as a computer, smartphone or tablet, companies can manage employee time and attendance from multiple locations, set up schedules, run reports and export timesheets to payroll software at their convenience.

Mapping and recording where and when employees are ‘on-the-clock’. Businesses can set up the option so that remote employees can clock in or out only if the employee’s smartphone has GPS location recording enabled.

Employees are empowered, by allowing them to check their time records and select reports to view anytime, without the need to contact HR personnel.

Managers can view their employee time cards, make edits, send messages and view totals, all on a smartphone, iPad or tablet.

Originally from : http://news.thomasnet.com/companystory/Small-Businesses-Better-Able-to-Manage-Remote-Field-Based-Employees-with-PayClock-Online-from-Lathem-20009912

Summary.

Why not trade up your existing clock in machine for something that will speed up your payroll and add to your workforce management toolbox.  Even if you have one of the more modern software driven clock in machine systems, be sure to check out our range, you might be missing out on some great new feature.

clocking in systems